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I want to solve a pair of ODEs using the FEM solver of Abaqus. Is it possible for the user to supply the equation and ask Abaqus solver to solve the equations?

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to scicomp! the question in this form is probably too general. Can you give the equation you want to solve ? (you can enter it in LaTeX, it is understood by the website). What did you try before ? $\endgroup$ – BrunoLevy Sep 15 '15 at 13:00
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to SciComp! Your question is also better asked on an Abaqus-specific forum. It's probably off-topic here because we don't get many Abaqus users. $\endgroup$ – Geoff Oxberry Sep 15 '15 at 13:48
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No, ABAQUS is not a general-purpose PDE solver. It solves the PDE for a number of pre-defined applications such as structural analysis or heat transfer in solids. Of course many physical phenomena are governed by the same equation as heat transfer so you can solve those problems by treating them as heat transfer problems in ABAQUS.

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    $\begingroup$ Although he can develop User Routines for Elements (UELs) to solve different problems. $\endgroup$ – nicoguaro Sep 15 '15 at 16:59
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    $\begingroup$ Yes, that is a very good point. The ABAQUS user element capability is fairly general so definitely expands the type of problems that can be solved. Implementing a user element is a non-trivial task but is certainly easier than writing your own FEA code! $\endgroup$ – Bill Greene Sep 15 '15 at 17:13
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    $\begingroup$ I'd just like to add that the UEL restricts you to no more than 12 DoFs at each node. In addition, visualization can become difficult, as Abaqus no longer knows that DoFs 1-3 represent a displacement field, as may be the case if you are coupling mechanics to a PDE that Abaqus does not natively solve. This either requires some creative hacks (eg: super-compliant ghost mesh on top of normal mesh) or post-processing in a different application. $\endgroup$ – Tyler Olsen Sep 16 '15 at 0:50
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I write this as an answer, since I cannot comment. As already explained, Abaqus is not well suited for your problem. You should have a look at Fenics (http://fenicsproject.org/), which is a general purpose PDE solver.

Update: I learned that Comsol also provides an interface for user-defined PDE and weak forms.

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  • $\begingroup$ How do you know that Abaqus is not well suited for the problem of interest? He hasn't described the equations. As mentioned in the comments of BillGreene answer, Abaqus has UEL that extend the capabilities. $\endgroup$ – nicoguaro Sep 18 '15 at 16:05
  • $\begingroup$ I have used both Fenics and Abaqus umat/uel interface. That's how I know. $\endgroup$ – Rainer Glüge Sep 18 '15 at 17:15
  • $\begingroup$ I understand that, but still I think that you can't read minds. $\endgroup$ – nicoguaro Sep 18 '15 at 17:17
  • $\begingroup$ In Fenics you just enter the integrand of your variational form, you don't need to mess with element formulation, unlike UEL. The Jacobian alone... For someone who wants a quick solution Fenics is better. I don't say it is not possible with Abaqus, but it requires more FE insight. $\endgroup$ – Rainer Glüge Sep 18 '15 at 17:22
  • $\begingroup$ I understand your point. But maybe @sumanta needs to use Abaqus for some reason. The discussion is not about which one is easier or the best FEM for including equations, but about Abaqus being able if doing it. $\endgroup$ – nicoguaro Sep 18 '15 at 17:25

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