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I am an intermediate user of Matlab and Mathematica, but I would really love to start learning Python language for scientific purposes (I am interested in Maths and Physics).
Could please someone recommend me a book for learning scientific Python (the best would be a book inclusing also some codes to be able to put directly my hands on it)?
Thank you in advance!

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    $\begingroup$ Are there particular areas of maths or physics of interest to you? $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 28, 2021 at 18:16
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    $\begingroup$ One approach I find useful is to take some Matlab code I have written/used and re-write it in Python. If you don't have a special need for Python, and since you already know Matlab, I would recommend learning Julia. $\endgroup$
    – cfdlab
    Commented Mar 1, 2021 at 6:42
  • $\begingroup$ @Aruralreader I am interested (for personal passion) in soft matter, but I also need computer skills for compulsory university courses about quantum mechanics! $\endgroup$
    – Anna Stone
    Commented Mar 1, 2021 at 20:11
  • $\begingroup$ @cfdlab thank you for your suggestions, I will try! $\endgroup$
    – Anna Stone
    Commented Mar 1, 2021 at 20:12

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One the most useful things I found myself when converting from matlab to numpy/scipy was this page NumPy for MATLAB users. I even look at this every once in awhile to remind myself even to this day. I also highly recommend taking a look at the matplotlib gallery as what you probably want to do visually in either MATLAB or Mathematica is hopefully represented there and you can see the corresponding code to do it in the gallery (I also use this constantly).

Beyond this I highly recommend Hans Petter Langtangen's books on Scientific Python (there are a few). These have been around for a bit so maybe someone may have some better suggestions but these have also been great introductions and are general enough that I think they can get you started. I think they are approachable for most though and enjoyable to read.

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Since you already know Matlab and Mathematica, I would go with SciPy Lecture notes. It is a course on using Python for Scientific purposes.

Gael Varoquaux, Valentin Haenel, Pierre de Buyl, Gert-Ludwig Ingold, Emmanuelle Gouillart, Michael Hartmann, … João Felipe Santos. (2017, October 4). scipy-lectures/scipy-lecture-notes: Release 2017.1 (Version 2017.1). Zenodo. http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3894791

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