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Do you suggest any references (papers, monographs, books) about the philosophy of computational science?

Recently, I found out about the following two:

  • Winsberg, E. (2009). Computer simulation and the philosophy of science. Philosophy Compass, 4(5), 835-845.

  • Winsberg, E. (2010). Science in the age of computer simulation. In Science in the Age of Computer Simulation. University of Chicago Press.

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"The Art of Doing Science and Engineering" by Richard Hamming is a fount of wisdom, written by a computational scientist but aimed at a more general scientific target. Oldie but goodie.

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Probably one of the more-cited papers is Oreskes et al (1994), Verification, Validation, and Confirmation of Numerical Models in the Earth Sciences (link). I don't agree with the substance of it but I think it's worth a read.

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Patrick Roache (who has published research on the verification and validation of numerical solutions of PDEs) has a presentation and a book titled A Defense of Computational Physics.

My TLDR summary is that because "Essentially, all models are wrong but some are useful", the philosophy of computational science should concern itself not with Popperian falsifiability but rather concern itself with the validation of the accuracy of computational models.

Validation is different from verification. Verification is showing that the numerical solution produced by the program is a mathematically correct solution to the differential equations in the model. Once code has been written and verified to correctly solve the mathematical model, validation is the process of showing that the model solutions are accurate (enough) predictions of real-world behavior.

It's confusing that some philosophers have used the word "verification" for what V&V researchers call validation.

A set of presentation slides are available at:

https://slideplayer.com/slide/6251667/

The author also has a book.

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