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3

Tools like gmsh often require more information than STL provides -- the connectivity between triangles of the input surface mesh. You might be interested in trying TetWild, which can apparently reconstruct all of this connectivity information and correct for some level of degeneracy in the input data. The paper about it is very interesting too; they tested ...


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Why don't you take a look a HEALpix which provides a nice equal area hierarchical triangulation of the surface of the sphere with no distorted triangles: https://healpix.jpl.nasa.gov/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HEALPix https://healpix.sourceforge.io/ Here's the NASA illustration of the hierarchy: The package has been instrumental in producing maps and ...


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I found a solution by replacing the points with line segments: #poly = geom.add_polygon(pts, mesh_size = mesh_size) #loop = geom.add_curve(poly) #geom.in_surface(loop, ball_srf.surface_loop) ...


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To get the triangles in the last surface Recombined into quadrilaterals, you simply need to add the surface #9 into the last line: Recombine Surface {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}; This will result in: Also, you might be interested in the Mesh.RecombineAll = 1; option. And playing with the 2-D Recombination algorithm via Mesh.RecombinationAlgorithm might ...


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You should ask this on gmsh list. The gmsh developer answers questions. Searching online suggests an answer http://geuz.org/pipermail/gmsh/2020/013631.html Create a geo file like this Merge "input.msh"; SetOrder 2; Save "output.msh"; and run it in Gmsh.


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