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3

Pseudoinverse can be computed using the SVD $A = USV^\top$ by: $$ A^+ = V\Sigma^+ U^\top $$ where $\Sigma^+$ is formed from $\Sigma$ by taking the reciprocal of all the non-zero elements. With that in mind, you could use MATLAB's svds function as follows: [U,S,V] = svds(A,k); Ainv = V*diag(1./diag(S))*U'; Here k refers to the rank and svds computes only a ...


6

As Federico has mentioned, you probably don't want to deprive yourself of the learning experience. I'll just give you a small nudge in the right direction. You will never be able to store $A$. You also won't be able to store $(A+uv^T)^{-1}$. However, you don't really need to. You can easily write down a formula for each of the entries in $A$. Instead of ...


0

So why don't you very literally do what is being asked. The difference between two curves is the surface area between the two curves. This is 1 number, which you can then plot as a function of the number of terms in the Taylor expansion. There is however a small snag, the area will depend on the range of x's you consider. So there are two options, either you ...


4

Sounds like you want to omit the use of a MATLAB toolkit/Octave package. Of course you can build the bode diagram from scratch: % transfert function as anonymous function h = @(s)(1)./(2*s.^2+3*s+4); % frequency vector w = 2*pi*logspace(-2,2,1000); % magnitude & phase estimation mag = abs(h(1j*w)); magDB = 20*log10(mag); phaseDeg = rad2deg(angle(h(1j*w))...


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