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1

From a technical standpoint, your simulation is possible, if highly impractical. The operating system uses virtual memory to abstract resource allocation away from calling processes, but the good thing about that is that your 4Gb of RAM can seem infinite to your simulation program because the operating system will simply use disk space for all the RAM memory ...


4

A first step, if you "have never been up in computing", is to read the literature and see what others are doing and have done. The second step is that you will likely learn that what you want to do is not possible today -- at least unless you have access to supercomputers. I suspect that 3 billion particles is possible today, but only if you have access to ...


5

The short answer is: it depends. Some journals have a requirement or a guideline to have experimental results that corroborate the numerical simulations. For example, IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques rarely publishes papers that do not have experimental results in one form or another. However, this is very different for IEEE Transactions ...


4

Standard examples of PDE to solve with the typically taught basic discretization methods (Crank-Nicolson et al.) are Transport equations, and other first order equations like Burger's, have often explicit solutions and conservation laws that the numerical methods more-or-less satisfy The heat equation with different boundary conditions and source terms is ...


2

If you're interested in modelling any type of PDE within MATLAB, the Partial Differential Equation Toolbox should be able to handle anything you're interested in. The complete documentation for the toolbox can be found here. . A suggested workflow for some simple examples can be found here. The solvable equations via the toolbox are described in detail here....


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