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5

About your question #1: Whether something is "thin enough to be a membrane" or not is not a question of thickness. A "membrane" is an object that has no resistance to bending, just to stretching. On the other hand, 3d structures resist bending. For example, a 1cm thick layer of the floppy kind of foam that is sometimes used to pack ...


5

For comment #2 I would suggest looking into the immersed boundary (IB) method. The idea behind this method is to combine an Eulerian description of the fluid with a Lagrangian description of the solid structure. The fluid-structure coupling is achieved by injecting a force term into the Navier-Stokes momentum equations: $$ \rho\left(\frac{\partial \vec{u}(\...


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Let's consider the one-dimensional string first. Standard text-book physics considers the three usual boundary conditions here, namely Dirichlet (endpoints of the string are fixed), Neumann (endpoints are free) and Robin conditions (obtained e.g. when the endpoints are attached to a spring). Now, for real sonic propagation, those boundary conditions won't ...


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